3heads-gear3headschatchecklistglobehead-lockhead-plusimaclife-ringlogo-cornelllogo-melbournelogo-northhamptonlogo-portsmouthlogo-small logo-vancouverlogo-yokohamamail-line mail-wings pdf pie-chartplayplugprinter skype website

This post is part of the #EdublogsClub – a group of educators and edtech enthusiasts that blog around a common theme each week. Simply write a post and share it to join in, or sign up to receive email reminders of each new prompt. 

 

When working with students, we often hear the term “meet them where they are.” Most times, we think of this in terms of their mastery of skills. However, sometimes it can mean engaging them in their own interests. Whether it’s Minecraft, SpongeBob, or Hamilton the Musical, bringing popular culture into the classroom in meaningful ways can engage students and build relationships.

Here is what a Texas’ High School student has to say on the subject:

This week, we discuss the different types of strategies for using popular culture in the classroom to further student engagement.

Prompt: Write a post about using popular culture in the classroom.

Some questions to jumpstart your thinking:

  • What kind of popular culture do you bring into the classroom? How do you use it?
  • Do you have any comic books or graphic novel favorites that you use for reading and textual analysis? Why do you choose those?
  • What are your favorite television shows or movies in your classes? Why do you find these helpful tools?
  • Do you have any favorite songs that you bring into your classroom? How have students responded to your music? Why do you bring in these pieces?

I can’t wait to learn from everyone with this topic. Remember to share a link in the comments below.

Happy blogging!

Get Our Free Weekly Email!

Like what you read here? Signup for our free weekly email and we will send you links related to education, blogs, and more.

Subscribe!
About Ronnie Burt

Manages the Edublogs, CampusPress, and WPMU DEV Hosting services. Former secondary math teacher and wannabe musician. Follow @ronnieburt on twitter!

25 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


    • I also love memes! They say a picture is worth a thousand words, but a pic & a line, as in a meme, can speak a lifetime!

      I hadn’t even thought about memes as part of pop culture (silly me!) so thanks for the reminder, Nina!
      BrP

      • Barbara Paciotti
    • I totally sympathize Alicia. As one with a full head of grey hair, the most significant event for my children was the Challenger Disaster and for me it was the Kennedy Assassination when I was in 9th grade! It’s harder than ever to keep up with what’s current & impactful!
      BrP

    • Nice job Julie!

      I think you and I were on the same wavelength this week on this topic. I love your use of books as pop culture. I went directly to TV shows, but books work too and they do quickly shape ‘pop culture.’

      Have a great week!

      • Catherine Finger
    • Emily,
      I love your post. I’m not super-cool either. Lucky for me I’m not in the classroom with regularity anymore so I rely on my super-cool teachers to keep my up to speed. 😉

      • Anne Schaefer-Salinas
    • Dan,

      This is GREAT! And wow, if all your references are still considered pop culture then perhaps I am hipper than I thought. 😉

      • Anne Schaefer-Salinas